the intelligence of things

WILSON PARRY

Wilson Parry, Twisted Velvet, 2013, Velvet, found metal, foam, polyfill, magic sculpt, wood, tar, and paint, 3 ft x 3 ft x 6 feet

In the past year and a half, I have shifted from painting representations of the human figure to a material investigation in sculpture. In painting, my process explored an ideological paradigm based on gender role theory. My work was heavily influenced by Judith Butler’s theory of gender performativity and theories of masculinity.
My sculpture work is based more on material investigation. In particular I’m concerned with abjecting bodily forms with opposing materials to create tensions between virility and disease and masculinity and femininity. For example, in my series of found-metal sculptures, industrial metal is crushed and beat into shape. Then, in response to the metal’s shape, fabric is wrapped, sowed or pressed into the metal. As it unfolds, there is a swing between aggressiveness and fragility that I want to come through in the materials. Understanding my materials is an important part of the process. I gain understanding by being physical with the materials: twisting, tearing, bending, and mending. This wrestling match allows me to put my body in motion with the material, feeling its tension with mine. I allow it to swim through me and let it can be what it wants.

Wilson Parry, Twisted Velvet, 2013, Velvet, found metal, spray foam, blue foam, magic sculpt, wood, tar, and paint, 3 ft x 3 ft x 6 feet

Wilson Parry, Untitled, 2013, Soft foam, tar, oilstick, ink, spray paint, 42 x 38 inches

Wilson Parry, Bulge, 2013, Found metal, velvet, wood, foam, polyfill, 40 x 30 x 30 inches

Wilson Parry, Door, 2012, Found metal, velvet, spandex, wood, 80 x 50 x 30 inches

Wilson Parry, Captain, 2012, Wood, velvet, polymer, shoulder pads, 6 x 6 x 7 feet

Wilson Parry, Triumph, 2012, Foam, wood, steel, aqua resin, acrylic paint, sponges, 5 ft x 6 ft x 7 feet

Wilson Parry, Social Circle, 2012, Oil and plexiglass, 12 x 12 x 16 feet

Wilson makes sculpture out of found metal, velvet and tar that suggest bodies under pressure. His process is concerned with fragmenting and abjecting bodily forms with opposing materials to create tensions symbolic of virility and vulnerability, masculinity and femininty, and glamour and decay. Wilson got a BA in Economics from Amherst College, and then studied art at the Museum School of Fine Arts in Boston. Wilson has had solo shows at Gallery Swanström (Boston, Ma) in 2006 and Gallery Benoit (Boston, Ma) in 2010 and has been featured in several group exhibitions. In September 2012, Wilson showed for the first time in New York at Temp Art Space. In February 2013, he was selected for a juried exhibition at Brenda Taylor Gallery (505 West 28th Street, New York, NY). Wilson has been featured in Art Info, Hyperallergic, Boston Magazine, Improper Bostonian, and the Harvard Crimson. He lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.